Videos on Immortality

The following are some of the available videos on video sharing sites such as Youtube about the subjects of longevity and regenerative medicine. Most of these videos contain individual insights and footages from lectures and academic forums.

Lawrence Goldstein, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD School of Medicine, as well as the Director of the UCSD Stem Cell Program, discusses the basic principles of stem cells. He examines the promise they offer and how they can be safely and effectively employed. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging"

What controls aging? Biochemist Cynthia Kenyon has found a simple genetic mutation that can double the lifespan of a simple worm, C. Elegans. The lessons from that discovery, and others, are pointing to how we might one day significantly extend youthful human life.

Interview

Research results from the UNM-UCSB Tsimane Health and Life History Project--a joint health and anthropology project aimed at understanding the impacts of ecology and evolution on the shaping of the human life course. Focus on health, growth and development, aging, economics and biodemography of small-scale populations of hunter-gatherers and horticulturalists. Also biomedical and anthropological research with medical attention among Tsimane, an indigenous forager-farming group living in central lowland Bolivia in the Beni Department.

Planarians have attracted the attention of generations of biologists. It is not hard to see why: cut a worm into two fragments and each fragment regenerates a complete organism. Cut it into 8 fragments and each individual fragment will go on to regenerate a complete animal. In this second part of the lecture, I will briefly review the rich history of planarian research, followed by a summary of the central principles of planarian regeneration that have been derived from this extensive, often fascinating body of experimental work.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Recognizing that the root of disease is often at the nanoscale, the question arises if medical diagnosis and therapy would not also work best at the nanoscale. Patrick Hunziker from the University Hospital Basel exemplifies how nanoscience methods, materials and tools can be used to advance medicine.

Who wants to live forever? Anti-aging guru Aubrey de Grey discusses the latest in life extension research.

A number of neuroscientists, working today with simple model organisms, are investigating the hypothesis that chemical brain preservation may inexpensively preserve the organism's memories and mental states after death. Chemically preserved brains can be stored at room temperature in cemeteries, contract storage, even private homes.

Hank explains why NASA and the European Space Agency are in love with tardigrades and how these extremophiles are helping us study the panspermia hypothesis.

To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and team study the world's "Blue Zones," communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. At TEDxTC, he shares the 9 common diet and lifestyle habits that keep them spry past age 100.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Scientists have found a substance in red wine that is slowing down the aging process in mice. Will it someday lengthen the lives of humans, too? Morley Safer reports.

In the third and last part of this lecture, I will introduce the model system we have developed to study animal regeneration, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. I will review its anatomy, and the biological attributes that make these animals extraordinarily well suited to dissect the molecular and cellular basis of regeneration. I will also discuss recent work from my laboratory aimed at identifying molecules associated with regenerative capacities.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

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