Videos on Immortality

The following are some of the available videos on video sharing sites such as Youtube about the subjects of longevity and regenerative medicine. Most of these videos contain individual insights and footages from lectures and academic forums.

Researchers at a Scottish university say the technology will speed up progress towards the creation of artificial human organs.Scientists have taken a step closer to creating artificial human organs and using them for transplants after 3D printing produced clusters of stem cells. In the short term, the technique could be used to generate tissue for drug-testing currently carried out on animals.

Gordon Lithgow is a Professor and the head of the Lithgow Lab at the Buck Institute for Age Research. His research is focused on the relationship between stress and aging by studying genes that effect lifespan and an animal's ability to resist stress. His lab is also investigating the mechanisms of chemical compounds that extend lifespan. These compounds also suppress disease-related features during worm aging. In addition, we are studying the role of protein aggreagtion in determining lifespan.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala's young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

The Singularity Summit 2011 was a TED-style two-day event at the historic 92nd Street Y in New York City. The next event will take place in San Francisco, on October 13 & 14, 2012.

What you need to know about resveratrol in wine. Randy Alvarez interviews Medical Doctor and owner of Torii Mor Winery in Willamette Oregon about longevity.

Dr. Anders Sandberg is a well known transhumanist, futurist, computational neuroscientist and currently a research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute in Oxford University. I enjoyed talking to him last time he was on Singularity 1 on 1 and was happy to have him back for another one.

A lecture on "The Science of Weight Loss" from the Life Extension Nutrition Center's Grand Opening celebration, featuring Life Extension's Dr. Stacy Nottingham.

In How to Create a Mind, The Secret of Human Thought Revealed, the bold futurist and author of The New York Times bestseller The Singularity Is Near explores the limitless potential of reverse engineering the human brain. Ray Kurzweil is arguably today's most influential—and often controversial—futurist. In How to Create a Mind, Kurzweil presents a provocative exploration of the most important project in human-machine civilization—reverse engineering the brain to understand precisely how it works and using that knowledge to create even more intelligent machines. Kurzweil discusses how the brain functions, how the mind emerges from the brain, and the implications of vastly increasing the powers of our intelligence in addressing the world's problems. He thoughtfully examines emotional and moral intelligence and the origins of consciousness and envisions the radical possibilities of our merging with the intelligent technology we are creating. Certain to be one of the most widely discussed and debated science books of the year, How to Create a Mind is sure to take its place alongside Kurzweil's previous classics.

"The Future of Medicine" workshop facilitated by Dr. Michio Kaku for the University of Rhode Island's 15th Annual Diversity Week.

Scientists have found a substance in red wine that is slowing down the aging process in mice. Will it someday lengthen the lives of humans, too? Morley Safer reports.

Nir Barzilai, M.D., discusses the Longevity Genes Project and his quest to find ways to delay the aging process. Dr. Barzilai is director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and an attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Hank introduces us to another amazing organism - the "immortal jellyfish," Turritopsis dohrnii - and explains how it can extend its life cycle indefinitely through a process known as transdifferentiation.

Tardigrades or "Water Bears" are the only creatures that can survive the extreme conditions in the vacuum of outer space.

The Health Medicine Forum Presents
Anti-Aging Strategies: Balancing Diet, Exercise and Hormones
Featuring Frank Shallenberger, MD, HMD and Meg Jordan, PhD, RN
November 19, 2002, Oakland, CA.

At Singularity Summit 2009.

Cryonics involves the cryopreservation of humans as soon as possible after legal and clinical "death". Legal and clinical death differ importantly from biological death or true (irreversible) cessation of function. It is therefore a mistake to portray cryonics as an alternative to cremation or burial. It is true that cryopreserved people are not alive but neither are they dead. Cryonics should be seen as part of the field of life extension. Cryonics enables the transport of critically ill people through time in an unchanging state to a time when more advanced medical and repair technologies are available. Even after "longevity escape velocity" has been attained and aging has been largely tamed, cryonics will continue to be needed for people who die of accidents or diseases for which there is no cure at the time.

Imagine re-growing a severed fingertip, or creating an organ in the lab that can be transplanted into a patient without risk of rejection. It sounds like science fiction, but it's not. It's the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine, in which scientists are learning to harness the body's own power to regenerate itself, with astonishing results

In this episode of Breakthrough Medicine, experts from the University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) use adult stem cells to repair organs and save lives.
In this episode of Breakthrough Medicine, experts from the University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) use adult stem cells to repair organs and save lives. A heart attack victim receives his own stem cells in hopes of repairing his damaged heart muscle, and after all other methods have failed, patients with chronic wounds turn to a revolutionary study that heals broken skin.

This video explains how genetic medicine, nanotechnology, bioprinting, cryonics and several other developments may in future be used to increase the human lifespan.

A lecture on DNA Damage and Repair taken from the Molecular Genetics module at the University of Bradford.

5-time Hugo Award winning author Vernor Vinge, one of the most lauded SF writers of our era, discusses his work and concepts from it, including the concept of "The Singularity" which he coined, and his latest novel, "Children of the Sky," the sequel to "A Fire Upon the Deep."

Regeneration has fascinated philosophers and scientists since the beginning of history. The wide but uneven distribution of regenerative capacities among multicellular organisms is puzzling, and the permissive/inhibitory mechanisms regulating this attribute in animals remain a mystery. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide a general history of regeneration research from ancient Greece to the beginning of the 20th century. Key concepts will be introduced in their appropriate historical context, and many of the unanswered questions put forward by the problem of regeneration will be discussed

Speaker: Dr Aubrey de Grey
Aubrey de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist based in Cambridge, UK,
and is the Chairman and Chief Science Officer of the Methuselah
Foundation

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