Videos on Immortality

The following are some of the available videos on video sharing sites such as Youtube about the subjects of longevity and regenerative medicine. Most of these videos contain individual insights and footages from lectures and academic forums.

Researchers at a Scottish university say the technology will speed up progress towards the creation of artificial human organs.Scientists have taken a step closer to creating artificial human organs and using them for transplants after 3D printing produced clusters of stem cells. In the short term, the technique could be used to generate tissue for drug-testing currently carried out on animals.

Nir Barzilai, M.D., discusses the Longevity Genes Project and his quest to find ways to delay the aging process. Dr. Barzilai is director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and an attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

At Singularity Summit 2009.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Imagine re-growing a severed fingertip, or creating an organ in the lab that can be transplanted into a patient without risk of rejection. It sounds like science fiction, but it's not. It's the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine, in which scientists are learning to harness the body's own power to regenerate itself, with astonishing results

Regeneration has fascinated philosophers and scientists since the beginning of history. The wide but uneven distribution of regenerative capacities among multicellular organisms is puzzling, and the permissive/inhibitory mechanisms regulating this attribute in animals remain a mystery. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide a general history of regeneration research from ancient Greece to the beginning of the 20th century. Key concepts will be introduced in their appropriate historical context, and many of the unanswered questions put forward by the problem of regeneration will be discussed

Tardigrades or "Water Bears" are the only creatures that can survive the extreme conditions in the vacuum of outer space.

This holiday season give yourself the gift of good health and check out the latest breakthroughs in Russian medical science. Russia's leading cardiovascular center tests out a brand new artificial heart valve that combines the best of the biological and mechanical worlds. Dental surgery is no longer such a headache with the latest laser scalpel developed in St. Petersburg. Fancy living forever? A Moscow State University professor thinks he might have found the key to giving Father Time the slip, at least temporarily. And see how doctors use state-of-the-art simulators to hone their skills out in innovation-obsessed Kazan.

Interview

Ben Goertzel speaks about the Singularity, what it is, road maps, the risks and the benefits etc.

Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala's young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

Lawrence Goldstein, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD School of Medicine, as well as the Director of the UCSD Stem Cell Program, discusses the basic principles of stem cells. He examines the promise they offer and how they can be safely and effectively employed. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging"

What you need to know about resveratrol in wine. Randy Alvarez interviews Medical Doctor and owner of Torii Mor Winery in Willamette Oregon about longevity.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Speaker: Dr Aubrey de Grey
Aubrey de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist based in Cambridge, UK,
and is the Chairman and Chief Science Officer of the Methuselah
Foundation

Scientists have found a substance in red wine that is slowing down the aging process in mice. Will it someday lengthen the lives of humans, too? Morley Safer reports.

Gordon Lithgow is a Professor and the head of the Lithgow Lab at the Buck Institute for Age Research. His research is focused on the relationship between stress and aging by studying genes that effect lifespan and an animal's ability to resist stress. His lab is also investigating the mechanisms of chemical compounds that extend lifespan. These compounds also suppress disease-related features during worm aging. In addition, we are studying the role of protein aggreagtion in determining lifespan.

Planarians have attracted the attention of generations of biologists. It is not hard to see why: cut a worm into two fragments and each fragment regenerates a complete organism. Cut it into 8 fragments and each individual fragment will go on to regenerate a complete animal. In this second part of the lecture, I will briefly review the rich history of planarian research, followed by a summary of the central principles of planarian regeneration that have been derived from this extensive, often fascinating body of experimental work.

Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative studies have shown the relationship between accelerated telomere shortening and life stress and that low telomerase levels are associated with six prominent risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Recognizing that the root of disease is often at the nanoscale, the question arises if medical diagnosis and therapy would not also work best at the nanoscale. Patrick Hunziker from the University Hospital Basel exemplifies how nanoscience methods, materials and tools can be used to advance medicine.

Hank introduces us to another amazing organism - the "immortal jellyfish," Turritopsis dohrnii - and explains how it can extend its life cycle indefinitely through a process known as transdifferentiation.

A number of neuroscientists, working today with simple model organisms, are investigating the hypothesis that chemical brain preservation may inexpensively preserve the organism's memories and mental states after death. Chemically preserved brains can be stored at room temperature in cemeteries, contract storage, even private homes.

The Health Medicine Forum Presents
Anti-Aging Strategies: Balancing Diet, Exercise and Hormones
Featuring Frank Shallenberger, MD, HMD and Meg Jordan, PhD, RN
November 19, 2002, Oakland, CA.

Hank explains why NASA and the European Space Agency are in love with tardigrades and how these extremophiles are helping us study the panspermia hypothesis.

Cryonics involves the cryopreservation of humans as soon as possible after legal and clinical "death". Legal and clinical death differ importantly from biological death or true (irreversible) cessation of function. It is therefore a mistake to portray cryonics as an alternative to cremation or burial. It is true that cryopreserved people are not alive but neither are they dead. Cryonics should be seen as part of the field of life extension. Cryonics enables the transport of critically ill people through time in an unchanging state to a time when more advanced medical and repair technologies are available. Even after "longevity escape velocity" has been attained and aging has been largely tamed, cryonics will continue to be needed for people who die of accidents or diseases for which there is no cure at the time.

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